Catholic Social Thought Matters

Catholic Social Thought Matters

October 30, 2017

Moral Questions and Nuclear Arms

by Nicolo Orozco (COL'19)

On Thursday November 2, a panel will gather in Dahlgren Chapel to have a dialogue on the "Moral and Policy Questions on Nuclear Arms and North Korea." This dialogue happens at a critical time when the threat of North Korea’s nuclear capabilities is rising to the forefront, and Pope Francis’ support of nuclear disarmament is becoming increasingly vocalized. While North Korea has been dominating headlines recently, global nuclear armament has been a prevalent issue for some time. The Federation of American Scientists estimates that there are approximately 14,930 nuclear warheads in the world today—down from 70,300 in 1986—of which North Korea has no more than 20. The rising problems associated with nuclear armament are neither new nor limited to North Korea.

October 30, 2017

Elevating Women’s Voices in the Church and in Our Communities

by Maria Cornell (SFS'20)

The first Catholic president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, is known for many things, but he rarely is recognized for his role in the women’s rights movement. Under the Kennedy administration, the Civil Rights Act and the Equal Pay Act were passed, and the Commission on the Status of Women was established. Though parts of Kennedy’s legacy are less bright regarding his record with women, he took unprecedented strides to protect the dignity of the human person—a core tenant of Catholic Social Thought. However, the presence of laws and ideals supporting equality in our society are not enough to change behavior. Equality and dignity must be institutionalized in every aspect of our culture and promoted among our youth and more tenured leaders, including those in religious and political positions.

About the Blog

This blog brings together leading policymakers, academics, Initiative staff, students, and others to discuss applications of Catholic Social Thought to contemporary issues and the relationship between faith and public life.
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